An administrator can authorize others within the organization to have specific delegated administrative rights. This article describes some ways rights might be delegated within an organization.

Managing direct reports

An administrator could give sales managers the ability to manage certain attributes and/or rights of the individual sales team members without any additional rights granted either on-premises or in Office 365 for those sales managers. Here’s how it looks:

Self service

An administrator might want to give certain users the ability to manage some of their own access or information. For example, some executives might be able to log in to Nova and grant themselves access to resources/information without calling the helpdesk to get access.
Similarly, you might configure a policy that enables all employees to use Nova to update some of their basic information (for example, their phone number and address). This is called the “self service” option, here’s how it looks:

Delegated administration within an organizational unit

Finally, an administrator might want to set up someone within an organizational unit to manage access of others within that organizational unit. For example, you might have an organizational unit containing employees who work in a certain office location. You might assign administrative rights to the site manager or administrative assistant. It could look like this:

As you can see, Nova is highly customizable. In any of these examples, the administrator can specify which access rights managers/individuals/delegate administrators can assign to themselves and others.

Examples

Here are a few examples of delegated administration.

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